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SS Honouring the Dead British Soldiers


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#1 Jörg Biermann

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Posted 03 October 2010 - 04:23 PM

Here is a picture of SS honouring the dead of some british soldiers. I thought it was quite cool.

http://www.ww2incolo...56518-2/123_008
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#2 jergulson

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Posted 03 October 2010 - 04:42 PM

Inflammatory title of thread mate.

The organizations' status in international law is clear, though members of the Waffen-SS branch conscripted after 1943 are not individually culpable due to their forced inclusion in the criminal organization.

Edit
We are not speaking of clans using SS nomenclatura. That bothers me about as much as a clan that say called itself by a mafia family name and used mafia titles. So does not bother me at all.

But the historical organizations are a different matter, though as noted, individuals conscripted were not culpable and those volunteering have generally served their sentences.

#3 Cpl.Guillemette

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Posted 03 October 2010 - 04:56 PM

For propaganda use?

Seems like a coastal place...
any idea where this is from?
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#4 Mikeedude

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Posted 03 October 2010 - 05:23 PM

The flags look like royal navy ensigns, so maybe some jack tars were washed up? (and the view does look like sand dunes)

I'm presuming its very late war as the dwarf on the far right wouldnt have been enlisted till they were scraping the barrel for men.
Nice of them to bring flowers...

#5 Razorneck

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Posted 03 October 2010 - 05:36 PM

Due to the quality of the image I can't determine the people in the background. I see a couple of officers on the sides. However to me, the bunch in the middle look like farmers. Typical european farmers of the era sadly, so that doesn't help determine the location. But I agree it looks coastal.
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#6 Lamb

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Posted 03 October 2010 - 11:04 PM

I wouldnt have thought the Germans would have had much time to be honouring dead British soldiers if it were late war.

All things considered I'd go for either Post-Dunkirk or Post-Dieppe. A crap load of Naval personnel were involved in both Operation Dynamo and Operation Jubilee and may well have been Killed and recovered by the Germans.

Knowing the Pas de Calais and the sheer area of Sandunes between Calais and Ostend (including Dunkirk) I would say that it was taken in early June 1940.

Seems I may have to have sex with darkest nation while razor sprays us with whipped cream. But thats fine.


#7 Cpl.Guillemette

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 12:10 AM

that's what I tought myself, beiing before 1943.

Seeing like it's Marine flag,
Hitler personally gave order to kill all commando prisonners.
So it would need to be some marine soliders.
Then it can only be from 1940 to 1942 in the big raids or dunkirk evacuation, or small vessel attack on the german convoys.

I don't think it is in Norway either.

Other than 1940 for some propaganda purpose I don't see either why it would be.

What do you guys think?
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#8 Alvin Fuchs

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 12:54 AM

The organizations' status in international law is clear


As determined by the Nuremberg Trials of 1945. Hardly an example of unbiased justice. :roll:
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#9 SS-Kommando

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 04:46 AM

Where can you see that they are Waffen-SS soldiers?

As determined by the Nuremberg Trials of 1945. Hardly an example of unbiased justice. :roll:


True that.

#10 Doggzillen

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 07:14 AM

This is almost surely directly after the fall of France, as I've read other accounts of burying the enemy, but all the soldiers talked about it like it was the only time they had ever seen it. Even high ranking officers refer to it as something immensely rare.
The thing is, these may be bodies which washed up, and local units took it into their hands to bury them. Seeing as how few bodies their are, I would assume so.

#11 Mikeedude

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 07:39 AM

The blokey left-middle with head sticking over dunes looks like an officer but not a german one?

#12 jergulson

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 11:50 AM

Oh, I am pretty sure we would Guatanamo the crap out of volunteer waffen SS members by today's standards too.

#13 Lamb

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 12:56 PM

Actually are we sure those chappies sitting down in the upper left aren't British POWs? They all appear to be wearing Uniform clothing and sitting with standing germans around them?

Perhaps it is the crew of a small ship, (perhaps an MTB) that grounded due to enemy action early in the war? The crew are attending the funeral of their comrades before transportation to Germany and Internment.

Alternatively, remember that Marines as a branch of the navy would be buried with a White Ensign, AND those who died in the St. Nazaire Raid (1942) were buried with full military honours (before the commando order), so the alternative hypothesis is that this is a picture of the German Coastal Garrison at St. Nazaire burying Marine casualties of the Raid in the dunes along the river at Pornichet or St. Brevin-les-Pins, while their captured comrades (of whom their were a fair few) look on?

Basically, no idea, but two nice scenarios

Seems I may have to have sex with darkest nation while razor sprays us with whipped cream. But thats fine.


#14 Ernst

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 06:37 PM

You do not have to be an expert to determine whether or not this photo is for propaganda purposes or not. First off it is a poorly composed shot that has poor definition. No official war correspondent would ever take a photo as poor as that. This was obviously taken by an individual with his own personal camera for private use. The yellowing shows its not on acid free paper which I would hold as another indicator.

As for a time period I would think 1940 (after the fall of France) although I don’t think you can really put a solid date on it. I doubt much later as later on 41/42/43 SS units were not on coast duties.

P.S. SS units although others would argue against were humans like any other, I don’t see anything sinister in this scene.

P.S.S. I am not sure if this photo even depicts SS men, the scan is so poor I can't make out any insignia that would indicate them to be member of waffen SS


Regards
Ernst Hoffmann
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SS-Obersturmführer u. Zugführer i. d. 1./SS-Pz.Gren.Rgt "Deutschland"




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